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OHA continues to press on, working to:
  • Minimize watershed impacts associated with the Buckhorn gold mine operations and exploration
  • Continuously improve the ecological health of the Okanogan Highlands
  • Increase community awareness and involvement in watershed issues
OHA

 
In Owl, award-winning photographer Paul Bannick uses his intimate yet dramatic images to illustrate four different nesting owl species—Northern Pygmy, Burrowing, Great Gray, and Snowy—throughout the course of the year in four distinct habitats. Each stage in an owl’s life is chronicled: courtship, mating, and nesting in spring; fledging and feeding of young in summer; dispersal and learning independence in fall; and, finally, winter’s migration. Unusual irruptions and the everyday struggle to survive are also covered... Continue


What's New?

Crown/Kinross submitted a draft Closure Plan in September 2016 that included very rosy predictions on how long it would take for closure of the mine to be completed. Closure is the period of time, after reclamation of the mine surface, that it takes to bring the water in the underground mine area into permit compliance. During operations, the mine area is like a mixing zone in that it is allowed to exceed permit limits. The predominate reason why Crown/Kinross could make such optimistic predictions is that they used less restrictive water quality standards in their computer model than the criteria required by the NPDES permit... Continue    Buckhorn Mine Portal

OHA is collaborating with Trout Unlimited, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and private landowners to improve ecological function and complexity within the Triple Creek reach. This project will benefit water quality and increase habitat for fish and wildlife by reducing severe stream channel incision that disconnects the creek from its floodplain... Continue
 
 Instream construction of beaver dam analogues at Triple Creek

A Year in the Lives of North American Owls
with Paul Bannick, on Friday, January 6, 2017:
In Owl, award-winning photographer Paul Bannick uses his intimate yet dramatic images to illustrate four different nesting owl species—Northern Pygmy, Burrowing, Great Gray, and Snowy—throughout the course of the year in four distinct habitats. Each stage in an owl’s life is chronicled: courtship, mating, and nesting in spring; fledging and feeding of young in summer; dispersal and learning independence in fall; and, finally, winter’s migration. Unusual irruptions and the everyday struggle to survive are also covered... Continue
   
Owl - Paul Bannick